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October 10th, 2014

BusinessValue_Oct08_BAs a business owner there are many different keys to success, one of the most important being your staff. If you take care of your employees, there is a good chance that your business will not only be successful but will hopefully also operate with healthy margins. What is sometimes a challenge though is actually managing employees and dealing with all the related information. An Enterprise Resource Planning solution, more specifically a Human Resources module, can be an effective tool that allows you to better manage your employees.

What are Human Resource modules?

ERP, or Enterprise Resource Planning, is a suite of integrated business software applications (often called modules) that allow companies to track and manage data and even automate some business functions, including Human Resources.

Human Resource modules in particular are used to track different people-related functions, such as planning, payroll, administration, development, hiring, and more. Business services, like Standard Operating Procedures, job postings, news, forums, tracking of work hours, and benefits, etc., can all be unified into one module, which makes overall management and decision-making easier.

Benefits of using HR modules

Businesses that have integrated ERP and more specifically HR modules, have been able to benefit in a number of ways. Here are 5:

1. Automated processes that free up management

A large function of HR, as with many other business processes, is data entry and reporting. If you are trying to develop reports without an integrated ERP system, you probably need to pull data from numerous sources which takes time. This is time that can probably be better spent on more relevant tasks.

An ERP module data, once set up, will be more accessible. This simultaneously makes it easier to enter and pull data together into reports. And because large parts of daily tasks can be automated, you can ensure that what you need to complete is actually achieved.

2. Enhanced sharing of information and collaboration

Because HR is a central function of any business, data related to HR needs to eventually be shared with other teams or departments. Without ERP this likely means you will need to ask different people to share their data and then compile it into a useable format.

With ERP for HR, data is stored in a central location, or brought together to a central location, which means that data from different sources can be shared faster and easier. This also ensures that the right data is shared, thus enhancing overall outcomes and making it simpler for other teams to work together.

3. Management gains a clearer picture of HR

It can be tough to gain a short-term picture of your employee resources, especially when it comes to identifying potential resource shortfalls (e.g., double-booked holidays, employees who are constantly late, etc.) and where improvements can be made. For example, in most modules you can track overtime hours of employees, and receive alerts when overtime is past a certain threshold.

If you spot that one department is consistently banking extended overtime hours, you can move quickly to address this.

4. Data is kept up-to-date

As we've stated above, HR systems usually involve data from various locations. This means that there is always a chance of duplicate or incorrect information. A healthcare ERP module can help ensure that the data is not only correct, but also not duplicated, which can in turn speed up decision-making and enable better decisions to be made.

5. Reduced licensing expenses

Without ERP, your HR team could need five or more systems in order to keep track of everything. Each of these systems will need to be licensed, which can often be a serious investment on your behalf, not to mention the costs of setting up and maintaining these systems.

Because HR ERP modules offer an integrated solution, you pay for one license to cover all of your needs. This reduces overall expenses while also making it easier to budget and maintain.

If you are looking to integrate an ERP solution in your business, contact us today to learn more about how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

October 9th, 2014

BusinessValue_Oct07_BBusinesses, like restaurants, boutique fashion stores, and even some delivery operations have flocked to mobile payment systems largely because you don't have to invest in expensive Point of Sale equipment and can instead run it all from a device like an iPad. With the recent new mobile payment announcements and continued enhancements, it is highly likely that mobile payment solutions will see explosive growth in businesses the world over.

What exactly is mobile payment?

Most people would define mobile payment as either using your mobile device as a wallet, or using mobile devices to accept payment. Many services allow users to link credit cards to their mobile device and simply scan it over a pay terminal to have their account charged.

Companies on the other hand usually pay a set per-transaction fee in order to use the system; something along the lines of, or slightly cheaper than, most credit or debit-based payment terminals.

If you are considering switching over, here is a brief overview of the most common payment solutions.

PayPal

In late September Internet auction giant eBay announced that they will be spinning off their popular Internet payment system PayPal sometime in 2015. While many users will utilize PayPal to pay online, there is actually a mobile payment solution called PayPal Here, which is expected to grow immensely.

With Here, you get a payment solution app with a card reader that plugs into most smartphones (Android, iPhone, iPad, Android tablets) and allows you to accept multiple types of payment from anywhere you have an Internet connection. You can even track cash payments and record checks.

Vendors can use this app free of charge, however they are charged a 2.7% per swipe fee, based on the amount of the transaction.

Apple Pay

Apple Pay is Apple's recently announced mobile payment system that utilizes NFC (Near Field Communication) on the iPhone 6. Users with an iPhone 6 will be able to link their credit cards to their phone and then will hover their device near a terminal and press their thumb on the device's fingerprint reader to pay.

Your payment information (an account number linked to your card. Apple has noted that actual card numbers are not stored) is stored in the Passbook, and will be accepted at an initial 220,000 stores in the US when it launches sometime in October. There is a good chance that small to medium businesses will be able to integrate this solution into their business in the near future, so it would be a good idea to keep an eye on this.

What is interesting is that many banks have announced that they are considering accepting, or will accept Apple Pay as a method of payment. This means that businesses with an existing NFC payment terminal - which is often provided by a bank - should be able to accept payment (if the bank does of course).

Rumors have it that merchants will not be charged a transaction fee to use this service; details will be solidified when the system goes live.

Square

Square is arguably the most popular, or at least the most well known, mobile payment system. With a card reader that is compatible with most popular mobile devices (Android, iPad, iPhone) users can set up a whole Point of Sale system via the Square Stand and accept a wide variety of payments.

To use this solution, you need either the card reader (which is free) or the Square Stand (which costs around USD $99). For each transaction there is a fee that starts at 2.75% for credit and debit cards.

Amazon's Local Register

Introduced in mid August, this new card reader is aimed at both PayPal and Square solutions. As with these, there is a card reader that can be plugged into most devices (Android, iPad, iPhone) and an app that goes along with it. Businesses with the reader can then use the device to accept payment.

Where this solution differs is that the reader costs USD $10 to purchase. That being said, the USD $10 is refunded towards your first transaction fees upon signing up. The transaction fees are also quite a bit lower. For businesses that sign up before October 31, 2014, there is a flat rate of 1.75% per swipe until January 1, 2016. Any business that signs up after this date will pay a flat rate of 2.5% per transaction (based on the total transaction amount).

Google Wallet

Google Wallet is a hybrid mobile and online payment solution that allows users to add credit cards to their wallet and pay for things either online, or at stores with NFC payment terminals (also called contactless terminals).

While most users who have made a purchase on Google Play, or have used their Google Account to make a payment have used Wallet, this hasn't been the most popular of solutions when it comes to customers using it to pay in-store. The reason for this is because there are only a limited number of devices with the required NFC radio (two to be exact). This system is also currently limited to the US only. Customers around the world can use Google Wallet to pay online however.

There is a good chance that with the recent new announcements and upcoming mobile payment products, Google will be pushing this out to more devices in the near future.

There are other mobile payment system options available, so it is a good idea to contact us before you implement one. We can help you not only find a solution that works for your business, but ensure that it can be integrated into your existing systems.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

October 1st, 2014

BCP_Sep29_BWhen it comes to business continuity, many business owners are aware of the fact that a disaster can happen at any time, and therefore take steps to prepare for this, usually by implementing a continuity plan. However, the reality is that many businesses implement plans that could lead to business failure. One way to avoid this with your continuity strategy is to know about the common ways these plans can fail.

There are many ways a business continuity or backup and recovery plan may fail, but if you know about the most common reasons then you can better plan to overcome these obstacles, which in turn will give you a better chance of surviving a disaster.

1. Not customizing a plan

Some companies take a plan that was developed for another organization and copy it word-for-word. While the general plan will often follow the same structure throughout most organizations, each business is different so what may work for one, won't necessarily work for another. When a disaster happens, you could find that elements of the plan are simply not working, resulting in recovery delays or worse. Therefore, you should take steps to ensure that the plan you adopt works for your organization.

It is also essential to customize a plan to respond to different departments or roles within an organization. While an overarching business continuity plan is great, you are going to need to tailor it for each department. For example, systems recovery order may be different for marketing when compared with finance. If you keep the plan the same for all roles, you could face ineffective recovery or confusion as to what is needed, ultimately leading to a loss of business.

2. Action plans that contain too much information

One common failing of business continuity plans is that they contain too much information in key parts of the plan. This is largely because many companies make the mistake of keeping the whole plan in one long document or binder. While this makes finding the plan easier, it makes actually enacting it far more difficult. During a disaster, you don't want your staff and key members flipping through pages and pages of useless information in order to figure out what they should be doing. This could actually end up exacerbating the problem.

Instead, try keeping action plans - what needs to be done during an emergency - separate from the overall plan. This could mean keeping individual plans in a separate document in the same folder, or a separate binder that is kept beside the total plan. Doing this will speed up action time, making it far easier for people to do their jobs when they need to.

3. Failing to properly define the scope

The scope of the plan, or who it pertains to, is important to define. Does the plan you are developing cover the whole organization, or just specific departments? If you fail to properly define who the plan is for, and what it covers there could be confusion when it comes to actually enacting it.

While you or some managers may have the scope defined in your heads, there is always a chance that you may not be there when disaster strikes, and therefore applying the plan effectively will likely not happen. What you need to do is properly define the scope within the plan, and ensure that all parties are aware of it.

4. Having an unclear or unfinished plan

Continuity plans need to be clear, easy to follow, and most of all cover as much as possible. If your plan is not laid out in a logical and clear manner, or written in simple and easy to understand language, there is an increased chance that it will fail. You should therefore ensure that all those who have access to the plan can follow it after the first read through, and find the information they need quickly and easily.

Beyond this, you should also make sure that all instructions and strategies are complete. For example, if you have an evacuation plan, make sure it states who evacuates to where and what should be done once people reach those points. The goal here is to establish as strong a plan as possible, which will further enhance the chances that your business will recover successfully from a disaster.

5. Failing to test, update, and test again

Even the most comprehensive and articulate plan needs to be tested on a regular basis. Failure to do so could result in once adequate plans not offering the coverage needed today. To avoid this, you should aim to test your plan on a regular basis - at least twice a year.

From these tests you should take note of potential bottlenecks and failures and take steps in order to patch these up. Beyond this, if you implement new systems, or change existing ones, revisit your plan and update it to cover these amendments and retest the plan again.

If you are worried about your continuity planning, or would like help implementing a plan and supporting systems, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 25th, 2014

AndroidPhone_Sep22_BMobile operating systems like Android have a wealth of features that users can take advantage of. However, many of these features are often hidden or not well represented. For example, did you know that on Android devices you can create folders on your home screen for your apps? Here's five tips on how you can create and manage these folders.

Creating folders

On most devices, when you install a new app the icon will be automatically added to your home screen, or onto a screen where there is space. While this is useful, many of us have a large number of apps installed, and it can be a bit of a chore actually finding the icon you are looking for.

The easiest solution is to group icons together into a folder. This can be done by:

  1. Pressing and holding on an app on your device's home screen.
  2. Dragging it over another app and letting go.
You should see both of the icons moved into a circle and kind of hovering over each other. This indicates they are now in a folder. It is important to note that these folders only appear on your home screen. If you combine say Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn apps into a folder on your home screen, they will not be put into a folder in your app drawer.

Naming folders

When you create new folders, you will notice that there is no text below the icon as there is with other icons. This is because you need to name the folder, which can be done by:
  1. Tapping on the newly created folder.
  2. Tapping on Unnamed Folder in the pop-up window.
  3. Naming the folder.
  4. Pressing Done at the bottom of the keyboard.
The name you assign to the folder will show up under each icon on your home screen. If you are going to use different folders, it is a good idea to pick names related to the apps they contain. For example, if you put all of your email apps in one folder, call the folder 'Email'. This will make your apps easier to find.

Adding/removing apps from folders

You can easily add apps to folders by either dragging them from the home screen over to the folder and letting go, or:
  1. Opening your device's app drawer (usually indicated by a number of squares).
  2. Finding the app you would like to put into a folder.
  3. Pressing on it, and holding your finger down until the home screen pops up.
  4. Dragging it over the folder you would like it to be placed in.
  5. Letting go.
If done right, the app's icon should be automatically dropped into the folder. You can also remove apps from folders by tapping on the folder where the app is, pressing on the app, then dragging it up to Remove, which should appear at the top of the screen. This will remove it from the home screen, but will not uninstall the app. You can also tap on the app and move it out of the folder to an empty place on the home screen.

Moving folders

You can move a folder's location the same way you do so with an app: Tap and hold on the folder until the screen changes slightly and drag it to where you would like it to be. On newer versions of Android, the apps should all move to make room for the folder.

Deleting folders

Finally, you can delete a folder by either dragging all of the apps out of the folder, or pressing and holding on the folder until the screen changes and dragging it up to Remove. This will remove the folder and all the stored app icons, but it won't delete the apps.

If you have any questions about using an Android device, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 24th, 2014

SocialMedia_Sep22_BSocial media has become an integral part of many business strategies, with an ever increasing number of companies adopting a variety of platforms. However, many business owners and managers are often unsure as to exactly how they can, or should, be using these platforms. In order to make things a bit easier, here is an overview of the three most common ways businesses use social media.

1. To be a resource for existing and potential clients

This approach is by far the most popular used by businesses of all sizes. The main idea here is that social media is used as essentially a two-way street where you can pass information about the company, products, and industry to your followers. In turn, they interact with the content and eventually start to turn to your profile and page when they are looking for information.

One of the best ways to be successful with this approach is to provide your followers with information about the company, facts, tips about your products and industry, and links to other relevant content.

By sharing content, users will generally interact with it more and begin to see your company as a reliable source of information. This often translates into enhanced brand awareness and potentially sales.

The downside with this approach however, is that it can be time consuming to constantly develop new content. Most companies eventually reach a point where what they produce and share is pretty much the same, and overall payoffs begin to decrease. One way around this is to work with professionals to come up with dynamic and different content.

2. To provide customer service/support

These days, when someone has a problem with a company's services or products, the first port of call for complaints is often social media, largely because it's the most convenient place to vent where you can get instant reactions.

It therefore makes sense to create support or customer service presence on these channels. Some companies have even taken to launching support-centric profiles, where customers can contact them about anything, from complaints to questions, and receive a personal answer. For many companies this is ideal because it eliminates the hassle of customers having to call a support line and dealing with automated machines.

This approach can prove useful for businesses because it often makes it easier to reach out to disgruntled customers and track overall brand satisfaction. The downside is that you will need someone monitoring services 24/7, and to respond in a timely manner which may be tough to do for many smaller businesses.

3. To sell something

There are an increasing number of businesses who have launched social media profiles with the intent of selling a product or service. The actual sales may not take place through social media but the information on these profiles and platforms channels potential customers to an online store or to contact a company directly. Social media's instantaneous nature makes for a tempting platform, especially when you tie in different advertising features and include content like coupons, and discounts.

While this hard sales line can be appealing to businesses, many users are seemingly put off of companies with profiles that only focus on selling via their platforms. The whole idea of social networking is that it is 'social'; this means real interactions with real people. Profiles dedicated only to trying to sell something will, more often than not, simply be ignored.

What's the ideal use?

One of the best approaches for small to medium businesses is to actually use a combined approach. Most people know that ultimately, businesses with a presence on social media are marketing something, but focusing solely on this could turn customers off.

A successful split that many experts have touted is the 70-20-10 rule. This rule states that you should make 70% of your content and profile focused on relevant information to your audience. 20% of content should be content from other people and 10% of content should be related to selling your products or services e.g., promotional.

If you want to use social media for support as well, it is a good idea to create a separate profile dedicated just to this end. If complaints are lodged or noticed using your main account, direct them towards the support account.

As always, if you are looking for help with your social media strategy, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
September 17th, 2014

BusinessValue_Sep15_BMany business owners and managers are well aware of the fact that if they really want to maximize their customer base they need to have a presence on the Internet. It used to be that having a website was enough to satisfy this, but now many customers are looking for businesses that are active online. One of the best ways to demonstrate this activity is through content marketing. The question then is how to ensure your efforts are successful.

What are the benefits of content marketing?

Before looking into ways you can implement content marketing that works, it is a good idea to look at the benefits of this type of marketing for businesses. One of the biggest pluses is that it boosts online engagement between you and your customers. If a customer sees that you are producing quality content that appeals to them, they will be more likely to interact and consider you when they need your products or services.

The other major advantage of a good content marketing strategy is that it helps show search engines like Google that your website and online presence are active. Because of the way search engines work, more active sites are usually ranked higher in results. If your website and overall Internet presence is seen to be active on a regular basis, you could possibly reach the first page of search results, which can lead to a boost in site visits, inquiries, and even sales.

If you have been considering implementing a content marketing campaign, or are looking to improve your existing efforts, the following four tips could help.

1. Always have a goal

The main thrust of many successful content marketing initiatives is that they tell a story. As with any narrative there needs to be an ending and in the case of content marketing this endpoint is a goal - something you want the reader to do. What do you want to achieve? Do you want customers to call? Do you want them to learn how to use your product?

By working backwards, you can then determine the right voice to use and best way to reach those customers who are most likely to react positively to the content. This also makes it easier for you to separate your campaigns and even launch multiple strategies at the same time.

Beyond this, having a goal can really help you narrow down the type of content you need to create. If for example, you know what customers you want to attract and how you want them to ultimately act, you can create content that is more appealing to them.

2. ABT

One of the most popular sayings amongst content marketers is to, "Always Be Testing (ABT)". When developing content you should be striving to test your content. Consider if certain images work better than others, as well as headlines, layouts, and content types, etc.

This could be as simple as developing three different social media posts and testing them with different market segments, or locations. You can then take what you have learnt from the tests and apply this to future posts.

The same can be said for more advanced content like blog posts or white papers. If you create different versions and layouts, and track the general downloads and interaction with the content, you can usually figure out how various people are reacting in different ways to a variety of content.

It is important to note here that content marketing is not a quick payoff style of marketing. You need to invest time, money, and effort into this and be willing to always be tweaking content. It takes time to pay off, but the time invested in testing what works and what doesn't work will help you develop better, more useful content.

3. Share and share alike

Creating content and just putting it on existing sites or sharing it with existing clients is not the most efficient way of making your content marketing show returns. Combine this with the fact that you will likely be using platforms like social media which are constantly changing and adding new content, and there is a good chance your content won't even be seen.

What you should aim to do is to share the content as much as possible. Share it on all of your social media platforms, link to it on your site, add it to emails, use the various social media content promotion features, and most of all: Share it again.

If you truly believe content is useful to your target market, you should aim to post it at least three to four times on social media. One of the most effective strategies is to share it on different days at different times, usually with a space of at least a week or two between posts. This can help maximize the numbers who see it.

4. Be prepared to fail

Failure is a part of business, and coincidently, it is also a part of content marketing. Face it, you might create content that just simply won't click as you intended. If this happens, your first reaction might be to pull the content and try something different. This may not be a good idea.

Sure, if the content is stirring up trouble, or has offended people, then it is likely best to remove it. But even if you aren't seeing the results you had hoped for, stick with the content for a bit. Try reposting it, and promoting more vigorously. It could very well be that users just didn't see the content.

As we stated above, successful content marketing takes time and effort. Once you realize this, and combine it with the fact that not everything will work, you should see a viable strategy surface over time.

If you are looking to learn more about content marketing and how our systems can help support it then get in touch and we can share our thoughts on how to be proactive and get results.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 17th, 2014

iPhone_Sep15_BSeptember 9 was a day eagerly anticipated by many Apple fans, largely because it was the day the company held their nearly annual announcement of new devices. This year the company announced not only two new iPhones but also a new smartwatch and some new iOS 8 features. If you missed the news then here is an overview of the new devices introduced at the event.

The iPhone 6

Before the September 9 event, rumors were flying for months about a new iPhone that Apple was working on. The company did not disappoint and announced a new version of their staggeringly popular phone. Here's an overview of the iPhone 6 specs which business owners and managers will want to know about.
  • Screen: The iPhone 6 will have a 4.7 inch screen (measured diagonally), and will sport Apple's new display, Retina HD, which has more pixels for a much improved image quality.
  • Size: The phone will be 5.44 x 2.64 inches and .27 inches thick. The device's shape has also been changed slightly with a more rounded body (compared to the iPhone 5's squared body) which should make it easier to hold.
  • Processor: This device will have what Apple calls the A8 processor. This is an improved processor over the one found in previous devices like the iPhone 5, and offers 25% faster speeds and 50% better efficiency. In other words, the device will be able to do more than previous versions, and do it faster.
  • Storage: You can choose either 16GB, 64GB, or 128GB of storage space.
  • Battery life: Apple has noted that the iPhone 6 should have the same, or slightly better, battery life than previous models. While this may not seem like an improvement, you need to take into account the bigger screen which requires more power to run.
  • Pricing: In the US, the iPhone 6 starts at USD 199 for the 16GB of storage. It should be noted that this is the price on a two year contract. If you want to purchase the model outright, prices start at USD 649 for the 16GB. Both the on-contract and outright purchase prices go up USD 100 for each increase in storage.
  • Availability: You could pre-order your device starting September 12, with it being available in many stores September 19. Chances are, the device will sell out quickly, so you may be put on a waiting list if you decide to purchase right away.

The iPhone 6 Plus

Alongside rumors about the impending iPhone 6, there were also rumors that Apple would be introducing a larger version of the iPhone 6 that is designed to compete with the various "phablets" (small tablets with phone capabilities) which are immensely popular these days. They did indeed announce a new, larger version of the iPhone 6 called the iPhone 6 Plus. Here is an overview of the major details that will benefit business owners and managers.
  • Screen: The iPhone 6 Plus will have a 5.5 inch screen (measured diagonally), and will sport Apple's new display, Retina HD, which has more pixels, meaning image quality will be much improved.
  • Size: The phone will be 6.22 x 3.06 inches and .28 inches thick. The device's shape has also been changed slightly with a more rounded body. It may take time to get used to the screen size and some users may not be able to use the device comfortably with one hand.
  • Processor: This device will have what Apple calls the A8 processor. This is an improved processor over the one found in previous devices like the iPhone 5, and offers 25% faster speeds and 50% better efficiency. In other words, the device will be able to do more, faster, than previous versions.
  • Storage: You can choose either 16GB, 64GB, or 128GB of storage space.
  • Battery life: Apple has noted that the iPhone 6 Plus will have a larger battery that supposedly offers 24 hours of talk time. Because this device hasn't been fully tested yet, it's difficult to tell what the actual battery life will be like, but it will likely be enough to get you through a day of moderate use.
  • Pricing: In the US, the iPhone 6 Plus starts at USD 299 for the 16GB of storage. It should be noted that this is the price if you get the device on a two year contract. If you want to purchase it outright, the device starts at USD 749 for the 16GB. Both the on-contract and outright prices go up USD 100 for each increase in storage.
  • Availability: Pre-orders for the device started September 12, but it was quickly sold out. Apple has noted that it should be in many stores as of September 19.

The Apple Watch

Apple wasn't done with just two mobile devices however, they also proved rumors true and announced a new device - the Apple Watch. This is Apple's take on the smartwatch that appears to be gaining traction with many users.

The Apple Watch is a rectangular device that is worn on the wrist and, as the name implies, is a watch. Well, a watch with numerous features that many users will no doubt enjoy. The device has a knob at the top-left which Apple calls the "digital crown", that you use to navigate the device. For example, pressing it opens the device's home screen, while turning it will zoom the face.

You can also interact the device via touch. For example, you will be able to swipe up from the bottom of the screen to open a feature Apple calls Glance. This provides you with useful information like the date, weather, notifications, etc.

Because typing on a device that is on your wrist is pretty much impossible to do accurately, the device supports voice commands and even interaction with Siri. The Apple Watch also has a multitude of sensors including health related ones like a heart rate sensor.

So far, it appears like this device is mainly aimed towards individual users, but business users who are looking for a way to interact with their devices or a different way to keep track of their most important information like calendars, etc. may find it useful too.

If the watch sounds interesting, you are going to have to wait for a while, as Apple has said it won't be released until the spring of 2015. While this may seem like a long time to wait, it could prove to be positive, as it gives the company more time to perfect the device. When released, Apple has noted that the Apple Watch will start at USD 350.

New iOS 8 features

New devices weren't all that was introduced at the event, Apple also talked about some new features that will be introduced in iOS 8.
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) and ApplePay - Both the new iPhone 6s and the Apple Watch will ship with NFC chips in the device. These can be used in conjunction with Apple's new pay service, ApplePay. Like other similar apps, you will be able to use your phone as a wallet, and swipe it over pay terminals to pay for items. Your payment information is stored in Passbook which creates a unique ID for each credit card, but does not store your credit card information.
  • Enhanced navigation - With bigger screens on both of the new iPhones, many users will want to hold the phone in landscape (horizontal) mode for easier viewing of apps. iOS 8 will enable this.
  • New gesture - Reachability - Reachability is a new gesture that will allow users to quickly switch the content at the top of the screen by tapping twice on the Home button.
For those of you who have an existing iPhone or iPad, you should have been asked to upgrade to iOS 8 when it came out September 17.

If you are looking to learn more about the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, Apple Watch, or iOS 8, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPhone
September 3rd, 2014

BCP_Sep02_BBusiness operators know that when it comes to business continuity, everything is about time. It doesn’t matter if you can recover your business activities if this isn’t achieved in reasonable time. But what is considered “reasonable”? This is what the business impact analysis (BIA) determines. The BIA aims to find out what the recovery time objective is for each critical activity within an organization. With that in mind, let’s take a look at five tips for reliable business impact analysis.

Five tips for successful business impact analysis:

  1. Treat it as a (mini) project: Define the person responsible for BIA implementation and their authority. You should also define the scope, objective, and time frame in which it should be implemented.
  2. Prepare a good questionnaire: A well structured questionnaire will save you a lot of time and will lead to more accurate results. For example: BS (British standard) 25999-1 and BS 2599902 standards will provide you with a fairly good idea about what your questionnaire should contain. Identifying impacts resulting from disruptions, determining how these vary over time, and identifying resources needed for recovery are often covered in this. It’s also good practice to use both qualitative and quantitative questions to identify impacts.
  3. Define clear criteria: If you’re planning for interviewees to answer questions by assigning values, for instance from one to five, be sure to explain exactly what each of the five marks mean. It’s not uncommon that the same event is evaluated as catastrophic by lower-level employees while top management personnel assess the same event as having a more moderate impact.
  4. Collect data through human interaction: The best way to collect data is when someone skilled in business continuity performs an interview with those responsible for critical activity. This way lots of unresolved questions are cleared up and well-balanced answers are achieved. If interviews are not feasible, do at least one workshop where all participants can ask everything that is concerning them. Avoid the shortcut of simply sending out questionnaires.
  5. Determine the recovery time objectives only after you have identified all the interdependencies: For example, through the questionnaire you might conclude that for critical activity A the maximum tolerable period of disruption is two days; however, the maximum tolerable period of disruption for critical activity B is one day and it cannot recover without the help of critical activity A. This means that the recovery time objective for A will be one day instead of two days.
More often than not, the results of BIA are unexpected and the recovery time objective is longer than it was initially thought. Still, it’s the most effective way to get you thinking and preparing for the issues that could strike your business. When you are carrying out BIA make sure you put in the effort and hours to do it right. Looking to learn more about business continuity? Contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 27th, 2014

socialmedia_Aug26_BMany businesses rely on visuals to sell their products. From bakeries to hotels, an attractive product will bring in the customers and ultimately profits. This is why social media services like Instagram have become so popular. Business owners are increasingly wanting to find out how they too can create high quality images on the mobile platform.

The truth behind some of Instagram's best images

Those awesome Instagram photos we see aren't always taken using mobile phones. Instead, many users use digital cameras which offer much better image quality. You can capture some amazing shots with a higher end DSLR cameras with multiple lenses.

If you have one of these cameras and are looking to create high-quality images for Instagram, or any other social media site, you may be slightly confused as to how to get the images onto the platform - especially since many of us use this via the mobile app. To make uploading a little easier, here is a brief guide detailing how to get images from your digital camera onto Instagram.

1. Transfer and process images

Once you have taken photos with your camera, you will need to get them off of your camera's memory and onto your computer's hard drive. Most camera's have apps that allow you to do this, so be sure to follow the instructions in the app that came with it.

When your images have been transferred to your computer, you are likely going to want to process them a little bit. This is especially true if you have a DSLR or other high-end point-and-shoot which takes RAW images. These can be quite large and are not compatible with Instagram.

Most images taken with a camera are quite large in size, so you are going to need to use an image editing program like Adobe Photoshop, or free tools like Pixlr to process them. What you are looking to do is to crop your images so that they are square.

If you are used to the advanced photo editing features, then do your edits before cropping. When you crop your images you should crop or resize them so that they are 640X640 pixels. This is the size of all images taken using Instagram's camera app.

Also, be sure to save the images as JPEGs, as this is the image format used by most smartphone cameras.

2. Save processed images in their own folder

It helps to create a folder somewhere on your hard drive (we recommend in the same folder where you save all of your other folders) that is specifically for images you want to post on Instagram.

When you have processed and edited the images to your liking, save the images here. Try using an easy to use file name like the date and a letter or note so you can easily tell which images are which, so you know which to use.

3. Move the images to your device

You can move images using the cloud or by manually transferring the images to your phone. If you decide to manually transfer your files, you will need to plug your device into your computer.

For users with iPhones, you can open iTunes and click on your device followed by Photos. Then select the box beside Sync photos from. Select the file you created in the step above and then Sync to transfer the images over.

For users with Android devices, plug your phone into the computer and drag the folder you created in the step above into the Photos folder of your Android device.

For Windows Phone users, plug your device into your computer and open My Computer on your desktop. You should see your device listed in the window that opens. Open the file system for your device and drag the image files you created above into the Photos folder of your phone.

If you choose to use the cloud to transfer your files, use the operating system's cloud (e.g., iCloud, Google Drive, or OneDrive) to upload the files. Just be sure to use the same account as the one on your phone.

4. Add images to Instagram

Once the photos are either on your device, or in the cloud, you can now upload them to Instagram. This can be done by:
  1. Opening the app and tapping on the camera icon.
  2. Tapping on the button in the bottom left of the screen.
  3. Selecting where the image is located on your device. E.g., the Gallery app if you placed the photos in your phone's hard drive, or the cloud service you used.
  4. Editing them as you see fit.
Once this is complete, you should be able to post your images as you usually do with any other Instagram image on your phone. Take the time to add filters, and hashtags as well as a good description before you post.

If you would like to learn more about using Instagram to share your images then get in touch and we will show you the advantages of the bigger picture.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
August 26th, 2014

androidphone_Aug26_BAs you learn about the different features of your Android smartphone, you’ll no doubt come across is location services and whether or not you want to approve these. While you might think this convenient feature can do you no harm, think again. Sometimes it’s best to hide your location in your smartphone as this can affect your device’s security. With this in mind, let’s take a look at how to change different location settings on your Android smartphone.

Photos and GPS tagging

Your Android smartphone gives you the ability to attach GPS coordinates to the pictures you take, known as geo-locating or GPS tagging. This lets you arrange pictures in albums by locations, or lets Google+ stitch together stories of your trips. Geo-locating images in itself isn’t a bad thing, but you can get into trouble when you broadcast sensitive locations to the world. For instance, a picture of your expensive watch with a GPS tag of your house isn’t the best idea.

Four ways to control geo-locating photos:

  1. Go to your camera settings and you’ll find an on/off toggle.
  2. Simply go into Settings>Location and from there you can decide if you want the location saved along with your images.
  3. Download an EXIF editor and manually remove the location information from specific images.
  4. You can also turn off location services altogether by going to Settings>Location.

Discrete location settings

Apart from location settings in photos and GPS tagging, Android actually has three discrete location settings which allow you to set how accurately you want location reporting to be. You can find these at Settings>Location, Note that this affects your smartphone’s battery life immensely.
  • High accuracy: This uses the GPS radio in your phone to pinpoint its exact location from satellites while making use of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular networks too.
  • Battery saving: This mode only uses Wi-Fi networks and mobile networks to identify locations, and while it might not be as accurate it will help your phone last longer.
  • Device sensors only: This only uses the GPS radio to find you. It may take a little more time to find your location since it’s not using nearby Wi-Fi and mobile networks to get your general location first. This also uses more battery.
Having your location settings turned off will not only help keep your smartphone’s security intact, but also help strengthen your smartphone’s battery life. Interested in learning more about Android phones and their functions? We have solutions for you and your business.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.